Sally talks inclusion with Katie

Katie: What does inclusion mean to you?

Sally: To be accepted. 

K: Can you think of times when you haven’t felt included? What does that feel like?

S: Ashamed. “Am I different from everybody else?” 

K: Where are some places where you feel really included?

S: With the ‘Write up your Street’ gang. With my family. With a few of my friends. We ring each other and text each other and I see them quite a lot.

K: And are there any groups you go to where you feel really included?

” Give them time, I think. Time where they can talk and if I can do anything for them “

S: I attend the Tyndale Centre in Dursley and everybody there is very friendly and people talk to me. They always say they can talk to me in confidence which is really nice. I don’t take their problems on board, I just try to talk them through their problem. I can’t actually solve it for them but I try to tell them where to go (in a good way!). It’s nice that I’ve got that contact with people.

K: How do you try to make sure that other people feel included?

S: Give them time, I think. Time where they can talk and if I can do anything for them I’ll do my best. It’s nice to say, “Come join us. Join in. Be a part of our team”. To have that compassion where you can put your arm around that person. To tell them you’ll be thinking of them. 

chat about what inclusion means to you

K: And you said at first that being included is about being accepted, so when you’re including other people, is that important – that you’re accepting them as they are?

S: Yes. I don’t put a label on anything. Everybody’s everybody. 

Follow us: